Soundtrack Snapshots | A New Creative Project

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Soundtrack Snapshots is a project idea I created purely by accident when I bought my Fuji Instax Mini camera a few weeks ago. I started taking snapshots (photos 1-3) and realized that the music I was listening to, humming, or thinking about was just as much a part of each moment as the photo itself. I’ve always had this weird fascination with the idea of “soundtracking my life,” and I thought it could be a cool creative project for myself and an interesting way to show my Instax shots. At first, the imperfections and crazy too much/too little exposure of the photos were frustrating to OCD me, but they’re growing on me and I’m learning to relax a little and love the “risk” of the instant film camera. Although, the occasional blown-out flash photos are still super annoying – I mean, come on… 10 photos per film roll don’t come cheap!!

Above are the first ten photos I’ve amassed on my desk over the last few weeks. If you hover over the photography page at the top of my blog, you can go to the Soundtrack Snapshots page and see the individual photos as well as the places, songs, and anecdotes I shared about each one. When I load new ones, I’ll post them first and then catalogue them on the page. If you have done or are going to start a similar project, I’d love to see it, so leave me a comment. 🙂

Hope you enjoy!

Love, E

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Things I’ve Bought & Loved: Sackcloth & Ashes Grey Socality Collection Blanket

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I came across Sackcloth & Ashes via Instagram and was instantly drawn in by the one-for-one model of business. The one-for-one business model was popularized in the US by TOMS Shoes, and means that for every item sold, another is donated to a person or organization in need. The day I bought my blanket, Sackcloth & Ashes was donating blankets to survivors of the Nepal earthquake, but usually they donate a blanket to your local homeless shelter upon purchase. I thought, “Oh that’s cool.” and then I looked at the dream-like photos of these Southwest style blankets… I have to note here that somewhere in my head I have a magical, free-spirited, pseudo hippie fantasy, and these fit the picture in my head. To say that I wanted one of these blankets was an understatement, so despite the $89 price tag, my fantasy and the one-for-one model made this a splurge/impulse buy that I, for once, do not regret.

This particular blanket is 100% acrylic (they also have fleece and alpaca wool in different patterns). It’s heavy and sturdy, perfect for cozy sofa reading, cool nights, or to use as an outdoor blanket for picnics, etc. It was stiff and scratchy when it arrived, so I’ve washed it once (and then hung it flat to dry), and it became softer afterwards, so I have a feeling that after a few more times, it will be perfect.

Read about the vision of Sackcloth & Ashes, and browse/shop the collection here.


*I am not associated with,  paid, or perked by the company for this post. My purpose in writing is merely to share products that I have bought for myself and love.  – E

Memorial Day: A Family Hero’s Legacy

Corporal Richard Livingston (1918-1944) KIA, France, World War II
Corporal Richard Livingston (1918-1944)
KIA, France, World War II

Grosse Pointe News (Grosse Pointe, Michigan), November 9, 1944

“Corp. Richard Livingston, Brilliant Pointe Student, Reported Killed in France”

Was on Special Administrative Duty When He Met Death Presumably During Raid Staged by Enemy”  A letter received on October 24 by Mr and Mrs Arthur Livingston of 369 St Clair avenue from Secretary of War Stimson has confirmed a previous message received from the War Department in August of the death of their son Corporal Richard Livingston somewhere in France on August 28.  When the first message was received Mr and Mrs Livingston were certain it was a mistake as their son was not in combat service but was a member of the European Chief Affairs Regiment a corps of men especially trained to take over the chief administration in areas which have been dispossessed of the enemy.  A letter however written by Corporal Livingston’s commanding officer on October and received here on October 19 confirmed the August message and gave the details of the circumstances of his death which his parents dared not reveal s they were transmitted to them under the personal censorship of the officer?  It was known only that Richard was with his unit engaged in their specialized administrative work in some important city in France wen it was attacked or raided by the Germans and a large number of his unit were killed.  Secretary Stimson communicated he was killed by enemy ???? and carried it ??? that the Purple Cross has been post?? awarded.  Corporal Livingston had had a most distinguished scholastic career. He was graduated from the Grosse Pointe High School in 1936 when he was an honor student and a ??? of his class. He was graduated from the University of Michigan in 1940. There he was a member of the Delta Upsilon and maintained ?? high scholastic ratings throughout his course.  He attended ???? Army Special Training Program and sent to Virginia Polytechnic for training. There he was selected as one out of a group of eight for further specialized training at Stanford University where he graduated in the Dutch language and ? study courses. He also spoke French fluently.  In March 1944 he went overseas to England as a member of the European Civil Affairs Administration and followed into France with the Normandy invasion in June. He had already completed several assignments in France before he met his death by enemy action on August 28.  Richard was 25 years old and was a member of one of Detroit’s oldest families. His parents have been residents of Grosse Pointe for the past 10-12 years. He was a great grandson on his mother’s side of the late Emory Wendell, a name familiar in the financial history of Detroit.  He was a former employee of the J.L. Hudson Company and of the Office of the Chief of Ordnance.  He was engaged to Miss Patricia Palmer of Detroit.


For my mom and I, the need to remember Richard has a strong pull. He was my grandfather’s closest cousin and friend. When he was killed, being an only child, his family line went with him. My grandfather could not serve (even though he desperately wanted to) because of a childhood bout with TB, so Richard’s loss was great for him. I honor them both by remembering Richard’s service and sacrifice. I wish I knew so much more information about him.


“The legacy of heroes is the memory of a great name and the inheritance of a great example.” – Benjamin Disraeli, February 1 1849